The Ebola virus has infected very few people in the United States, and none here in Vermont. But political debate about the disease has spread to the state’s congressional race. 

Incumbent Democrat Peter Welch and his Republican opponent Mark Donka have very different opinions about whether a travel ban is the best way to fight Ebola. 

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is questioning Entergy Vermont Yankee’s claims that the risk of accidents is negligible after the plant stops operating. 

Entergy Vermont Yankee applied to the NRC in June for permission to scale back emergency planning once its fuel is moved from the reactor core to the spent fuel pool. That includes eliminating or drastically reducing emergency planning zones in towns surrounding the facility.

Efficiency Vermont might seem like a non-profit that helps you get cheaper, more environmentally friendly light bulbs, but actually, it is a utility. Efficiency Vermont was created by the Public Service Board in 2000 to help Vermonters use less electricity. That savings is the energy Efficiency Vermont, as a utility, produces. It’s about 13% of our total electric consumption.

Vermont’s teachers’ union isn’t happy with Gov. Peter Shumlin.

In the midst of the South Burlington teacher strike that ended earlier this week, Shumlin weighed in on the issue, saying he believes strikes should be illegal for Vermont teachers. Shumlin favors binding arbitration for teachers and school boards in labor disputes.

The NEA agrees, but they were more than slightly irritated that Shumlin chose to raise the issue in the middle of a strike.

Burlington drivers who recently started making money with Uber are in violation of city taxi regulations, according to a new memo from City Attorney Eileen Blackwood.

“After carefully reviewing our Vehicle for Hire Ordinance, our office has concluded that Uber and its drivers are operating vehicles for hire and therefore are subject to its regulation,” Blackwood wrote in a letter to Uber.

Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott is running for his third term as Vermont’s second in command and as the highest-ranking Republican in the state.

He shares his thoughts on single-payer health care, school funding, renewable energy, job creation and stimulating the Vermont economy. And we’ll get his reaction to the IBM sale of the Essex plant.

Also on the program, we talk with Christine Ryan, executive director and lobbyist for the Vermont State Nurses' Association, about the shortage of psychiatric nurses in the state.

Last spring the legislature passed a law requiring foods that contain genetically modified organisms – or GMOs- to be labeled. That labeling will go into effect in 2016, and the details of how that labeling would work were left up to the Attorney General to figure out.

The AG’s office has just released an early draft proposal of the GMO labeling rules. And the office is holding meetings around the state this week to give manufacturers, farmers, grocers, and regular citizens a chance to take a sneak peek.

Any parent of young kids--or even older ones for that matter--struggles with the question of how much screen time kids should be exposed to in a given day or week. Experts say it should be limited, but what's the definition of "limited"? And how realistic is it in a 21st-century life populated by screens on every device from phones to tablets and computers, before we even get to TV's?

The former Dean of the now defunct Lebanon College in New Hampshire is trying to launch a new kind of educational institution that would offer liberal arts instruction in non-classroom settings.

Property tax reform has become a key issue in the race for lieutenant governor. Although the two leading candidates have very different plans to reduce tax burdens on the middle class, they both see an expanded role for state government in education funding.

Republican incumbent Phil Scott and his Progressive and Democratic challenger Dean Corren do agree on one thing: Many middle class families are getting hammered by higher property tax burdens.

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